Deciding the Dice

I’m in the midst of writing a new, small, fast role-playing game with a very specific purpose in mind.  It’s going to be based around rolling just one die, but I must decide which die to use.

Currently, I’m deciding between a d10 and a d20.  A d10 will make things even faster and easier and it’s perhaps slightly more unique than using a d20, but it would also give a narrower range of results and be less flexible.  A d20 is more ubiquitous, but people still really like using a d20, and it would give a wider range of results and add more flexibility.

Decisions, decisions.

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What Indie Games Mean to Me

If you take a moment to look over this website you’ll see that I’m a big supporter of the Humble Bundle, which promotes indie computer games using a pay-what-you-want system, and recently a promoter of ebooks as well, using the same system.

I’m a big supporter of the indie game scene in general, where you have small independent game developers and publishers creating and publishing their games directly to the public through the Internet, using services like Kickstarter to raise money or simply selling directly through their own website.  This allows them to create games that large game publishers, with their slow development cycles and stagnant ideas, would never green light.

A perfect example of this is Wasteland 2, a sequel to the acclaimed computer role-playing game Wasteland from the 80s.  Brian Fargo went to many of the large publishers asking for the funding to make Wasteland 2.  None of them were interested, thinking that no one would be interested in a game like that.  So instead, he turned to Kickstarter.  The goal was to raise $900,000 to fund the project.  Instead, they raised over $2 million, proving that there really was a desire for such games, and also proving that you don’t have to go through a big publisher and play by their rules to get a game published.

This of course holds many parallels to the ebook industry and authors being able to publish their ebooks directly, but that’s a subject for another post.

So, I’ve been thinking about what indie games mean to me.  I don’t expect them to have the most advanced graphics… after all, they tend to be dealing with smaller budgets… but I do expect the gameplay to be interesting.  They often have very nice soundtracks.  Most importantly, however, I expect them to have good stories.  When I play an indie game, that’s what I’m looking for.  A story that’s deeper, more compelling, and perhaps even more daring than what you’d get out of a main-stream game.

So for me, what I expect from an indie game, and what indie games mean to me, can be summed up in one word:  Story.

Piratey Reminiscence

As Talk Like a Pirate Day was earlier this week, it’s something that I’m still thinking about.

When I was growing up pirate things weren’t as pervasive in the culture and media as they are now.  Everyone knew about pirates of course, but it wasn’t something you encountered very often.

My first real experience with piratey goodness was the game Sid Meier’s Pirates! on the Commodore 64.  That’s what really got me hooked.

In Sid Meier’s Pirates!, you can play the captain of a ship, or a fleet of ships, either acting as a pirate, or under the banner of one or more countries, earning letters of marquee and increasing in rank and prestige from there, including earning land and even winning the hand of a governor’s daughter in marriage.

While all this is going on, you can also sack towns and drive the governor out and install a governor from the country of your choosing to help further a country’s goals, find pieces of a treasure map to find buried treasure, rescue members of your family, capture the silver train and treasure fleet, recruit more sailors to your cause and expand your personal fortune, all while sailing, getting into cannon fights, and sword duels.

Sid Meier’s Pirates! remains one of my all-time favorite games.  It was ported to a number of different platforms, including the Apple II and the Sega Genesis and was made into a number of versions, such as Pirates! Gold and the newer game, also called Sid Meier’s Pirates!, for all the modern video gaming systems, the PC, Mac, and the iPad.  Each version plays a little differently, especially in the areas of fighting with cannons, sword duels, and attacking towns over land.

I always found the most enjoyable remake to be Pirates! Gold, but the original Pirates! for the Commodore 64 is still my favorite.  I would recommend that anyone that hasn’t played one of the many versions before to find one and give it a try.

Another Idea

I just had yet another idea for a new game, and this one has me a bit excited.  I wouldn’t say it’ll be completely serious, but it could probably be played that way if you wanted to.  It’ll even come with a setting, imagine that.  This one is going to take precedence over the forthcoming d10 Tavern game.

The d10 Game

Considering this website is called The d10 Tavern, and is about role-playing, I was thinking it would be good to have an official d10 Tavern game.  I already have some ideas.